$1.00 .com's

Discussion in 'In The News' started by Fun4uoc, Jul 2, 2011.

  1. Fun4uoc

    Fun4uoc VIP

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    I hate godaddy but they are having a $1 .com sale.

    I'll be picking up a shitload myself.

    Coupon code PATRIOT1
     
  2. gspot

    gspot VIP

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    SWEET, awesome find! gonna stock up myself :tee:
     
  3. DKPMO

    DKPMO VIP

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    Do they limit the number of domains you can register?
     
  4. Solarus

    Solarus VIP

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    Yes, only 1 domain. Useless.
     
  5. mx10

    mx10 VIP

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    only 1 domain! outrage, i was about to be stoked
     
  6. xtspx

    xtspx VIP

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    Godaddy Promo Code

    Try promo code: NC3d17

    It provides $4.00 off the regular price so it's $12.17 discounted to $8.17 and free private Registration. No limit.
     
  7. Jester

    Jester VIP

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    Yeah but you cant use godaddy for email, one complaint and they lock your account, theyre one of the worst regis to use in my opinion
     
  8. xtspx

    xtspx VIP

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    I agree, but since the topic pertains to a godaddy promo, I provided arguably the best promo code out there (since it combines both a discount off the domain price, as well as free private reg).

    We use Dynamic Dolphin. In terms of pricing, I got them to lower their price for me to $8.75/.com (w/ private reg), same price for renewals.

    Dynamic Dolphin was recommended by a friend, in order to keep Haus at bay when we were just starting off and were making mistakes here and there. I don't know how or what terms they are on with Haus, but I haven't had a single complaint thereafter. Oh and they let you select a private reg profile which serves as the registrant, admin and tech contact info, meaning they allow you to use private reg info as your actual registrant info, so there isn't a private reg to remove if push comes to shove. I don't know the inner workings there, but I know they are awesome!

    check them out:

    http://dynamicdolphin.com/
     
  9. asiatiki

    asiatiki VIP

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    Last edited: Jul 2, 2011
  10. xtspx

    xtspx VIP

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    eh, 1 domain just isn't worth the time it takes to register it. My guess is that they will also charge for private registration...
     
  11. nickphx

    nickphx VIP

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    Using private registration on a domain you use for sending commercial email is a willful violation of the CAN SPAM act... Might want to read up on the case law before you go doing that....

    http://www.spamsuite.com/webfm_send/447
     
  12. roundabout

    roundabout VIP

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    There's been a lot of speculation on this point... my own two cents is that nobody will ever get in trouble for just using private whois. You need to be doing something else along with it (an additional charge) that would want to make someone come after you.

    So, you do porn, you spoof your IP, you use private whois, you're a target.

    You're a mailer doing everything else compliant, you have private whois, nobody will bother you.

    There's a valid argument that people wouldn't want their name exposed for fear of an angry/psycho recipient causing issues - so as long as they arent doing anything else shady, that alone would probably stand up in court.
     
  13. nickphx

    nickphx VIP

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    It could also go the other way.. Doing everything right but having private domain registration. That could give the feds enough to cause you trouble.. A few REGUS virtual offices are cheaper than a lawyer and fines.
     
  14. xtspx

    xtspx VIP

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    The feds would not ever "cause you trouble" for using a private registration service. The only reason the feds would pursue any interest in you, is if they have authority to do so persuant to any factual criminal activity committed by you, under circumstances inviting any reason for them to have this authority. Not publicly displaying your personal information is not a willful violation, but is in fact your right as an independent contractor. You can even utilize a privacy service when registering a Corporation and specifying an agent for service of process. If the "feds" would like to obtain your identity, they will simply subpoena it (or obtain a court order if necessary) from your registrar, under such circumstances, the registrar must relinquish your personal information. :27:
     
  15. nickphx

    nickphx VIP

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    Hey, if that lets you sleep at night keep thinking it man. The case law shows differently. If the law states you may not materially falsify contact information when sending commercial email and the courts have ruled that using domain privacy services is considered materially falsifying your information...... :hmmmm:
     
  16. xtspx

    xtspx VIP

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    Lol, take a few minutes to actually read the court documents located here:

    http://www.ca9.uscourts.gov/datastore/opinions/2009/10/28/07-10528.pdf

    Just a quick breeze through to page 3 will illustrate the reasoning behind this case:

    Defendants’ convictions arose from conduct relating to
    their business of sending unsolicited bulk email, popularly
    known as “spam,” advertising adult websites. See United
    States v. Kelley, 482 F.3d 1047, 1055 & n.2 (9th Cir. 2007)
    (Thomas, J., dissenting) (discussing origins of “spam” label).
    Defendants argue that 1) the district court committed reversible
    error in its jury instructions defining obscenity;


    The point is, if you willfully conceal your identity in order to commit fraudulent activities while sending unsolicited email in bulk, or otherwise, utilizing private registration just implicates you in the concealment of your identity for the purposes of such illegal activities. The same way that using a fake name on Facebook to commit a crime would add a similar charge in terms of concealing your identity. That certainly doesn't make it illegal unless it is done with the intention to commit a crime.

    The defendants were sending A) Spam, B) were involved in advertising adult websites (spam of course would permit them to send such adult content to viewers under the age of 18) which resulted in an obscenity charge. So as to not argue about this with you for much longer, I advise you print out the PDF and bring it to your attorney. See what he thinks... Better yet, we can ask Richard Newman (RBNINTERNETATTY) to give us his perspective on the matter. He's a friend of mine and I'm sure that with him being an industry attorney and an admin on this forum, he can clarify this for us. Can you PM him and direct him to this post Roundy?

    -X
     
  17. DKPMO

    DKPMO VIP

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    Claiming that Private WHOIS is non-compliant is one of the most ridiculous things I hear.

    There is absolutely nothing in the law that prevents you from setting up an identity proxy to represent you, as long as it acts as your valid contact where you can actually be reached. If you think about it there can be absolutely no legal rationale why [email protected] does not represent you just as validly as [email protected] and same goes for physical address - there is just no requirement to make it one of your office locations.

    Too much scaremongering with people misinterpreting the court rulings.
     
  18. Bubbles

    Bubbles VIP

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    This thread is inaccurate. 5+ years same Godaddy account. Billions of emails sent. I lose about a domain per month. Never had an account revoked. PS I'm with DKPMO about the legalities of sending mail with privacy turned on. Sure, anyone can argue anything in court but it's what sticks that counts.
     
  19. roundabout

    roundabout VIP

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    Will do ASAP...
     
  20. xtspx

    xtspx VIP

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    Absolutely, and case law cannot be taken out of context without proper consideration for all actions attributing to the courts decisions.
     

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