Comcast begin IPv6 rollout to customers

Discussion in 'In The News' started by ThisGuyOverHere, Nov 10, 2011.

  1. ThisGuyOverHere

    ThisGuyOverHere VIP

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    http://blog.comcast.com/2011/11/ipv6-deployment.html

    Deployment of IPv6 Begins

    Posted by Jason Livingood, Vice President, Internet Systems, in Network and Operations


    Comcast has been conducting IPv6 technical trials in our production network for more than a year, and we've been working diligently on IPv6 deployment for over 6 years. After so many years of challenging preparatory work, significant technology investment, internal skills development, and close collaboration with our technology partners, I am incredibly pleased to announce that we've achieved another critical milestone in our transition to IPv6 — we have started the pilot market deployment of IPv6 to customers in selected markets!

    We're now the first large ISP in North America to start deploying IPv6. This is a significant milestone not just inside our own company but also in the industry, particularly given the chicken and egg relationship between the availability of content and software that supports IPv6 and the deployment of IPv6 to end users.

    In no small part this is due to our belief and firm commitment that there is value in long-term, strategic investment in technologies such as IPv6, and that this has benefits beyond our company and customers, across the Internet ecosystem. It is also due to those of our technology partners that have been willing to "learn by doing" in our various labs and our technical trials, and have been willing to break a few things and take prudent risks with us in a quest to move quickly to execute on our technical vision. Lastly, over the past 6 years of testing, development, and deployment, thousands of employees from around Comcast Cable have directly played a part in getting us to where we are today, whether that was developing technical training, conducting quality testing, deploying new gear on our fiber backbone, upgrading our access network, upgrading our back office systems, and countless other tasks both big and small.

    This first phase will support certain types of directly connected CPE, where a single computer is connected directly to a cable modem. Subsequent phases in 2011 and 2012 will support home gateway devices and variable length prefixes.

    Critically, our approach is "native dual stack" which means customers will get both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses. Some other ISPs that are less prepared may be using tunneling or large scale NAT in the network. Those approaches are likely to result in some applications (such as some real-time applications) breaking or seeming slow. Native dual stack, the approach we are using, avoids breaking or slowing applications and maintains a better and faster broadband Internet experience. Our customers buy Xfinity Internet service in large part for our great speeds, and they can rest assured that they won't have to slow down as the world transitions to IPv6, as we've "just said no to NAT" in this phase of our IPv6 transition.

    Finally, it is worth noting that this is the start of pilot market deployments as opposed to full national deployment. As such, it is possible that this will not be without technical bugs in the near term. Our focus is in identifying any final IPv6 transition issues quickly and fixing them rapidly, so we can soon begin a national deployment.

    For all the key technical details, check out this complementary blog post from John Brzozowski.
     
  2. roundabout

    roundabout VIP

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    TY for story, here's an amendment:

    Comcast shifts some customers to IPv6, promises it won't hurt

    [​IMG]

    No sooner have you memorized the IP address of your media server and then your ISP has to go and mess it all up -- in this case, by adding a whole lot of extra digits. It's for a good cause, though: Comcast is launching its IPv6 pilot as part of a long and grueling global transition away from IPv4, whose 4.3 billion addresses are now severely depleted. The pilot will start with customers who have a simple connection straight from their PC to a cable modem and who are running an up-to-date OS. It will also allow old IP addresses to exist alongside the new ones, hopefully avoiding the slowdowns that can result from trying to translate between to the two formats on the fly. The good news? Once it's over, nobody should have to go through this upheaval again until there are 2^128 web-connected devices on the planet, and by then it'll be the last of our worries.

    Source:
    http://www.engadget.com/2011/11/10/comcast-shifts-some-customers-to-ipv6-promises-it-wont-hurt/
     
  3. Jax

    Jax New Member

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    http://www.atoomnet.net/ipv6_enabled_popular_mailservers.php is the results of a scrape I was going to do, alexa-ranked sites with ipv6 capable mail servers.

    It will be interesting to see how v6 plays out. Google is approaching 6 as a separate Internet, the c&w providers have a dog in the v6 hunt so they'll be quicker to adopt. Comcast is running public v6 DNS, but no public mail servers yet.

    In the v6 world, where anyone with an ASN can get a v6 /64 no questions asked (keep in mind that's 18,446,744,073,709,552,000 v6 IP addresses) IP reputation becomes meaningless, so DKIM signing, and specifically what domain is signing which fields will become the primary means of reputation accounting, and SPF records will be more likely to use name-based mechanisms, and the haus and other ip-blacklister will probably find themselves obsolete.
     
  4. DKPMO

    DKPMO VIP

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    Have you actually tried mailing them? Did anything get accepted over IPv6?
     
  5. Pinnacle99

    Pinnacle99 VIP

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    Cant wait. 18 gazillion fresh IP addresses. I suspect that revenue will increase substantially.
     
  6. jellyfish

    jellyfish VIP

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    I feel like writers *try* to make statements that in some time will just look ridiculous. Like o why would you need more than 512k.

    Well this only goes to 2000, but by then that will be the last of our worries. No, actually it wont.
     
  7. ThisGuyOverHere

    ThisGuyOverHere VIP

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    Yeah I saw that one too.

    If you look they quote the same comcast post for their source lol. We're all digging the same pie for news.

    I think you guys saw that IPv6 email I recieved, it had been routed through IPv4 before hitting gmail. There is definately IPv6 mail traffic out there.
     

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