Email Glossary

Discussion in 'Noob Central' started by gspot, Jul 12, 2011.

  1. gspot

    gspot VIP

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    For All of those Noobs Here is your official Email Glossary

    Bounce
    A soft bounce is defined as a temporary problem, such as not being able to connect to the intended recipient’s mail server. A soft bounce is also recorded when the recipient’s mailbox is full or a connection is refused or dropped, which can occur when the recipient’s mail server is busy. Soft bounces may be retried at a later time.

    Bounce – Block
    A block bounce is recorded when the error code includes any language that refers to a blacklist or delivery issue. Blocked bounces can be generated from the sending IP, domain name, or message content.

    Bounce – Hard
    A hard bounce occurs when the recipient’s mail server replies with 5xx error, which in most cases means that the attempt to deliver to that recipient will never succeed. An example of a hard bounce error is [email protected] does not exist, which commonly occurs when a list of members has not been contacted recently.

    Bounce – Soft
    A soft bounce occurs when the recipient’s mail server replies with an error other than 5xx, or never replies at all. An example of a soft bounce error could be caused by a server that overloaded or a user whose mailbox is full.

    CallerID
    The original name of the authentication standard developed by Microsoft that later became SenderID

    CAN-SPAM Act
    Passed in December 2003, the CAN-SPAM Act sets basic guidelines for sending commercial email messages in the United States.

    Clickthrough Rate
    The % of users that click on a message. This can be calculated using number of recipients that were scheduled, received the message, or opened the message.

    Confirmed Optin
    Conversion Rate
    This normally refers to the number of recipients that take the final action, such as completing a form or purchasing a product or service.

    Deliverability
    This term describes the overall amount of messages that reached the inbox and can be attributed to a specific campaign or for a sender overall.

    Delivery Rate
    The % of messages delivered (not bounced) versus the total number scheduled.

    Delivery Service Provider (DSP)
    A third party that provides tools for monitoring the Deliverability and performance of email campaigns. This typically includes seeding the list to measure Delivery Rates at major ISPs, scanning the content for spammy words and broken HTML and rendering the content in various MUAs. Examples include DeliveryMonitor, Pivotal Veracity, and ReturnPath.

    Domain Keys
    The most comprehensive authentication standard that signs each outgoing message with an encrypted key. While SPF and SenderID involve making changing to DNS records, DomainKeys requires senders to change the way that messages are constructed.
    Domain Keys Identified Mail (DKIM)

    Double-Optin
    See Confirmed Optin
    See Deliverability

    Email Service Provider (ESP)
    A service that manages a company’s customer database or list and provides tools for sending out different types of emails on a one-off or automated fashion. Most commonly used for “batch and blast” newsletters and email marketing, ESPs also provide services for managing transactional email messages, autoresponders, password reminders, alerts and more.

    Open Rate
    The % of users that open an HTML message versus the number of messages scheduled or delivered depending on the criteria. An open is captured when a user downloads a small, normally invisible image.

    MIME
    Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions – A standard for sending non text information. Commonly an email message is encoded in a MIME format allowing HTML compatible MUAs to display the HTML portion only.

    MTA
    Mail Transfer Agent. This is a mail server used to send and receive mail. Examples of MTA’s include the IronPort A60, Port 25 Power MTA, StrongMail MTA, and Sendmail.

    MUA
    Mail User Agent. This interprets and displays email messages. Examples include Outlook, Eudora, and Mozilla Thunderbird.

    NANAS / NANAE
    The NANAS group is forum used by the anti-spam community to post information about messages sent to spamtrap addresses. Posting in NANAS usually indicate a practice issue. NANAS is only used for posting information, NANAE is the forum where the anti-spam community discusses postings in NANAS and other issues related to email abuse. The community can be fairly volatile – proceed with caution.

    Optin
    Request to be added to an email list

    Optout
    Request of a list member to no longer recieve messages

    Reputation Service Provider (RSP)
    A third party that provides accreditation and reputation services to senders and receivers. RSPs collect data about bounces, complaints and other user activity and aggregate it into a master database similar to the credit reporting system used for getting a loan. This data is used by receivers to decide which messages are spam or not and used by senders to monitor and improve their mailing practices. Examples of RSPs include Goodmail, Karmasphere, Lashback and SenderScore.

    SenderID
    An authentication standard that goes slightly beyond SPF by looking at the headers of the message to determine the PRA, or purported responsible address.

    SMTP
    Simple Mail Transfer Protocol, the standard used for sending and receiving mail.

    Spamtrap
    Spam traps are addresses that have been posted by members of the anti spam and abuse communities to flush out spammers. If your list or your affiliates maintain lists that contain spam trap addresses, it usually indicates a serious issue with list acquisition practices. Spam trap addresses typically do not complain or request removal, so it is impossible to determine and remove them from a given list.

    SPF
    Sender Policy Framework. An authentication standard that specifies what IP addresses can send mail for a given domain. This is the easiest authentication standard to implement and is most widely used, but does not account for the visible headers in the message, such as the from and reply-to address.

    Transactional Messages
    Messages that are related to a service the user opted-in to and whose primary purpose is not to advertise a product or the use of a service. Typical examples of transactional messages include an order confirmation after you make a purchase or a bank statement.

    TLD
    TOP LEVEL DOMAINS i.e Yahoo, Aol, HOtmail, Msn ...etc the top-level-cable domains

    Zorch
    The “list that shall not be named”.
     
  2. BB_Wolfe

    BB_Wolfe VIP

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    Can you append some of the common blacklist terms to here as well? SBL, CBL, etc.
     
  3. ThisGuyOverHere

    ThisGuyOverHere VIP

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    Ya know what we all use "TLD" incorrectly.

    A TLD is indeed a Top Level Domain but its a .com or .net specifically and does not directly refer to MSN, Yahoo or AOL.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Top-level_domain

    This goes further to explain a TLD is actually just a .com and generic top-level domains are a group consisting of GOV, EDU, COM, MIL, ORG, and NET

    I think this needs to be edited and Yahoo/MSN/AOL should be called "Premium Webmail"


    -------------------------------------------------

    Unconfirmed opt-in - A new subscriber first gives his or her address to the list software (for instance, on a Web page), but no steps are taken to make sure that this address actually belongs to the person. This can cause e-mail from the mailing list to be considered spam because simple typos of the email address can cause the email to be sent to someone else. Malicious subscriptions are also possible, as are subscriptions that are due to spammers forging email addresses that are sent to the e-mail address used to subscribe to the mailing list.


    Confirmed opt-in (COI) - A new subscriber asks to be subscribed to the mailing list, but unlike unconfirmed opt-in, a confirmation e-mail is sent to verify it was really them. Many believe the person must not be added to the mailing list unless an explicit step is taken, such as clicking a special web link or sending back a reply e-mail. This ensures that no person can subscribe someone else out of malice or error. Mail system administrators and non-spam mailing list operators refer to this as confirmed subscription or closed-loop opt-in.


    SBL - Spam Block List
    Generally is an IP based blocklist. The most famous is Spamhaus Block List or SBL. This is a list of IP addresses which are believed to emit spam or similiar traffic.

    CBL - Composite Blocking List
    The CBL takes its source data from very large spamtraps/mail infrastructures, and only lists IPs exhibiting characteristics which are specific to open proxies of various sorts (HTTP, socks, AnalogX, wingate etc) and dedicated Spam BOTs (such as Cutwail, Rustock, Lethic etc) which have been abused to send spam, worms/viruses that do their own direct mail transmission, or some types of trojan-horse or "stealth" spamware, dictionary mail harvesters etc.

    PBL - Policy Block List
    PBL is a DNSBL database of end-user IP address ranges which should not be delivering unauthenticated SMTP email to any Internet mail server except those provided for specifically by an ISP for that customer's use.

    XBL - Exploits Block List
    (XBL) is a realtime database of IP addresses of hijacked PCs infected by illegal 3rd party exploits, including open proxies (HTTP, socks, AnalogX, wingate, etc), worms/viruses with built-in spam engines, and other types of trojan-horse exploits

    DBL - Domain Block List
    DBL is a realtime database of domains (typically web site domains) found in spam messages. Mail server software capable of scanning email message body contents for URIs can use the DBL to identify, classify or reject spam containing DBL-listed domains.

    ROKSO - The Register of Known Spam Operations (ROKSO) database collates information and evidence on known professional spam operations that have been terminated by a minimum of 3 Internet Service Providers for spam offenses

    DNSBL - (DNS-based Blackhole List, Block List, or Blacklist; see below) is a list of IP addresses published through the Internet Domain Name Service (DNS) either as a zone file that can be used by DNS server software, or as a live DNS zone that can be queried in real-time. DNSBLs are most often used to publish the addresses of computers or networks linked to spamming; most mail server software can be configured to reject or flag messages which have been sent from a site listed on one or more such lists.

    NJABL - Not Just Another Bogus List, or NJABL, is a DNS blacklist
    NJABL maintains a list of known and potential spam sources (open mail relays, open proxies, open form to mail HTTP gateways, dynamic IP pools, and direct spammers) for the purpose of being able to tag or refuse e-mail and thereby block spam from certain sources. NJABL automatically retests only listed open relays every 90 days

    URIBL - URL based blacklist.
    A URI DNSBL is a DNSBL that lists the domain names and IP addresses which are found in the "clickable" links contained in the body of spams, but generally not found inside legitimate messages.

    SURBL - SURBLs (no longer an acronym) are lists of Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) hosts, typically web site domains, that appear in unsolicited messages. SURBLs can be used to search incoming e-mail message bodies for similar sites to help evaluate whether the messages are unsolicited. For example, if http://www.buypillswithoutprescription.com is blacklisted, then e-mail messages with a message body containing this URI may be classified as unsolicited. SURBLs differ from prior DNSBLs, which commonly list mail sending IP addresses. SURBLs are a specific instance of the general URIBL list type. URIBL.com is a different, unrelated URIBL-type list.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2011
  4. Ironmail

    Ironmail VIP

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    FANTASTIC! We have been saying this for years and nobody seems to get the concept. You gotta wonder how it all got started.
     
  5. ThisGuyOverHere

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    LOL i got handed a shit brick by Keith for using it wrong several years ago.

    I dunno how it got started either but makes me wonder what other mis-information the general mailing community takes as gospel.
     
  6. Mak

    Mak New Member

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    Thanks Man ...it will help all noobz...
     
  7. CyVEX

    CyVEX New Member

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    Its worse when you try and explain to someone what TLD mailing is when yeah the whole term is pretty much mailing slang haha!
     
  8. mrgodlike

    mrgodlike New Member

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    So there are a few terms that are thrown around here that I still clearly don't know.

    Tried doing forum searches on them, ex: "What Does GI mean", "GI Definition", "GI Meaning", and various other combinations.
    Tried googling the terms

    Tried sites like these searching Google bulk email terms glossary.... (term 'mass mail term glossary doesn't get dick for relavent search results):
    http://www.strongmail.com/resources/email-glossary
    http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/...mail-Marketing-Terms-Marketers-Must-Know.aspx
    http://emailresourcecenter.net/blog/2010/06/06/email-glossary-of-terms/
    http://www.sendemailout.com/email-glossary.html


    So what I'm looking for is definitions of GI, TLD, Cables, and probably several to many more I forgot.

    I know TLD was explained above, but (from my extremely limited knowledge) I thought I read that GI = General Interest or General Internet..... So if it was General Internet, I'm assuming it means domain names? Which is where I"m confusing myself the actual difference between GI and TLD if I'm going solely off of my assumed definition of GI. There was also a time where I thought GI meant Gmail Inbox

    Now does Cables = Email addy from cable/broadband/isp aka comcast, charter, roadrunner, att...etc. In that case how is it that different from TLD (outside of the fact it would be emails purely from service provider and not free email sites and domain name email addresses)? Think I read a post on here about how cables are treated way different from TLD which is treated different than GI......


    All of that has me so confused that it hurts my soul....


    Edit: WOW....so after giving up on the search for those 3 I scroll down in the noob section and see 2 threads within 10 seconds of eachother that has the answers......Fuck me

    http://www.mailerforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3192
    http://www.mailerforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3141
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2012
  9. getstarted

    getstarted VIP

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    TLD= Top level domains (aol,yahoo,hotmail,gmail.) You are going to find that about 80% of all of your email addresses will be from these domains. Each one of them has there own setting, rate limits, Etc.

    Cables= Comcast, Roadrunner, Etc. (Everyone just calls them the cables.) But, you are right they are like the TLD.

    GI= General Internet. These are all of the other domains out thnere. xyz.com, kuygfty.net, Etc.
     
  10. sivli

    sivli New Member

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  11. PermaNull

    PermaNull VIP

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    "Anti" is an Anti-Spammer in general.

    Which could mean Haus rep, or any other blacklist provider rep anyone against it period.
     
  12. sivli

    sivli New Member

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    Thanks for that!
     
  13. roundabout

    roundabout VIP

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    I don't think this is correct either.

    At least from what I've read on NANAE... Anti-Spammers are not opposed to any bulk mail at all, as long as the recipients legitimately requested it. They actually support true bulk mailer, it's unsolicited mailers they are against.
     
  14. PermaNull

    PermaNull VIP

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    I think the correct definition for those who go after legitimate operations would be Money Hungry Scumbag.
     
  15. DKPMO

    DKPMO VIP

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    Spambulance Chaser is the most accurate term for those who abuse law to extort money from mailers...
     
  16. DKPMO

    DKPMO VIP

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  17. daryls

    daryls New Member

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    Wow! As a new member this thread has been a great read. Thank you to all the contributors.
     
  18. devlin

    devlin Banned

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    Thanks for sharing such a useful information. I think it will definitely help the newbies.
     
  19. aadner

    aadner New Member

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    Thanks, I don't know why I didn't see this the first time through :shot: but I'm glad I was able to find it. Good info!
     

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