How old is too old?

Discussion in 'Noob Central' started by quicknrandom, Jan 27, 2012.

  1. quicknrandom

    quicknrandom VIP

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    At what point is data too old to mail to? Would it typically be 2-3 months after optin date or can you mail beyond that?
     
  2. PushSend

    PushSend VIP

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    It's too old to mail the day it complains...or the day it stops delivering...or the day it stops opeing...or clicking...

    I poke fun at a legit question but the fact is any responsive data is really never too old to mail IMO.

    As for churning through data to pull all of this - I'd say after a month or so of trying you can junk it and move on.

    However there are a ton of opinions on this subject and while I generalize my answer it really is a matter of how you choose to mail and to what you're mailing. You might find that clean older data is a better than you think...

    :33:
     
  3. acooper

    acooper New Member

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    It doesn't matter how long ago an address was created, how long ago its recipient opted in (assuming you've mailed them, since), or how long they've been on your list. What matters is how long it's been since you last mailed them and how long since they last engaged. At major ISPs, especially, paying attention to the former is necessary to avoid expiration-driven traps, while maintaining the latter benefits your sender reputation, thereby reducing throttling and increasing inbox-placement rate (and thus conversions). Obviously, this is less important for cable domains, and even less so for GI, where such sophisticated methods are rare and there is instead a reliance on trap-driven, public blacklists and content-based filtering, but mailing to inactives still isn't going to do you any favors--past results are indicative of future results, in this case, and the past results are saying they're not interested.

    So, like PushSend said: Mail as long as it's working (deliverable, still subscribed, not complaining, and at least potentially converting), and stop as soon as it's not. The trick is figuring out what "at least potentially converting" means. Different inactivity cut-offs are going to make sense for different verticals. For example, general, lifestyle leads are going to "stay fresh" longer than leads for a specific product or service. Watch the numbers over time, split-test, etc., and you'll figure out numbers that work for different lead/offer/ISP combinations.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2012
  4. bluehairdave

    bluehairdave VIP

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    ive got data from one of my own offers from 2009 that STILL does very well. just the latest responders now of course. but still going!
     
  5. reddorado

    reddorado VIP

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    I stop mailing data under two scenarios:
    1. 90 days after opt-in if the user has not clicked.
    2. 180 days after the last click of any clicker.

    The thing to avoid is mailing to what ISPs consider "inactive" accounts. Those are users who have essentially abandoned their email accounts. Microsoft turns these accounts to spamtraps after 180 days with no login.

    I agree with everyone else about clickers. If users are still clicking / engaging with your mail, you can continue to mail those users forever, regardless of their opt-in date.
     

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