IPv6 RIPEness: One Year Later

Discussion in 'In The News' started by roundabout, May 11, 2011.

  1. roundabout

    roundabout VIP

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    Source:
    http://www.circleid.com/posts/20110510_ipv6_ripeness_one_year_later/
    ...
    IPv6 RIPEness: One Year Later

    A year ago, the RIPE NCC introduced IPv6 RIPEness — a system that rates IPv6 deployment of Local Internet Registries (LIRs) based on the following criteria:

    * The LIR gets one star if it has an IPv6 allocation

    Additional stars can be earned if,

    * The address prefix is routed on the Internet
    * A route6 object is registered in the RIPE Database
    * Reverse DNS has been set up

    In an earlier post on CircleID, "IPv6 RIPEness: the hard numbers on ISPs and Deployment Rates", published in April 2010, we saw that:

    * 27% of all LIRs (6,748 at the time) had IPv6 address space (one star), and
    * 8% of all LIRs (or a total of 540) had all four stars

    Now, one year later, the numbers have gone up:

    * 41% of all LIRs have IPv6 address space, and
    * 13% have all four stars

    In absolute numbers: more than 3,000 LIRs have IPv6 address space. This means that the RIPE NCC has made more than 1,100 IPv6 allocations within 12 months.

    It is also interesting to look at the development in some countries:

    * Slovenia is still the winner: More than 80% of all LIRs in that country have an IPv6 allocation, and almost half of them have all four stars
    * Armenia is now second on the list: 72% of all LIRs have an IPv6 allocation (45% last year)

    [​IMG]

    You might notice that some countries that had at least one or two stars previously now show no IPv6 RIPEness anymore. This is due to mergers or closures of LIRs in these countries and does not mean that IPv6 address space has been returned or revoked.

    Even though we are happy to see progress, many LIRs have not yet requested IPv6 address space from the RIPE NCC. We hope that the IPv6 RIPEness system is helping to encourage LIRs to deploy IPv6. Note that all LIRs that reach all four stars receive free t-shirts and now also an IPv6-enabled fridge magnet from the RIPE NCC :)
     
  2. bluehairdave

    bluehairdave VIP

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    it seems like everyone was talking about how you wouldnt be able to stop SPAM and/or emailers once IPV6 got going.

    Does anyone think that will be the case? 1ip and domain for every 10k emails and a new one etc etc? Since you can get so many IPV6 ip's and just turn and burn.

    That was the theory in the articles anyway I read.
     
  3. DaMadHatter

    DaMadHatter Active Member

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    Spamhaus will just start listing bigger blocks. Something they are already doing.

    Instead of knocking out a /28 or /27 they will start by knocking out whole /20's, /18's and so forth.
     
  4. bluehairdave

    bluehairdave VIP

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    they would literally have to block out 10's of thousand of ips each time if they did that with ipv6 right?

    this is from Spamhosers own page about it. Its just too much for them to economical have enough server power.

    "To tackle the problem of spam in IPv6

    The arrival of IPv6 presents internet mail servers with a very significant new challenge. Once IPv6 mail starts flowing in ernerst, the volume of IPv6 spam - in particular the potential volume of sources that can send spam in IPv6 - risks overwhelming current filter technologies. Blocklists designed to store millions of bad IP addresses suddenly need to cope with potentially many billions of bad IP addresses. Yet legitimate mail servers in the world number only a few hundred thousand. It thus becomes sensible to identify and single out the few hundred thousand to let past unimpeded."
     
  5. roundabout

    roundabout VIP

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    Not so sure about that - if anything, this is why they created the WhiteList, which takes the reverse approach... I think the WL will grow in size and become the new standard.
     
  6. DKPMO

    DKPMO VIP

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    I doubt anybody will be accepting any mail over IPv6 for a very long time. There is simply no upside for postmasters to allow it.
     

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